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20130421
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. ratified by the senate or the law of the land. and it sounds to me like one of the punchlines of your account, even though washington powers did grow, he did have a republican understanding, which required him to be very attentive to the commitments that were made by the nation. in the 1770s, we were not in position to make international commitments, but we did it with didn't have a lot of statutes on the book, but we have resolutions. would you not say when it washingtons experiences the commander-in-chief has a constitutional obligation to take seriously the commitment the nation has made in conventions like the geneva convention. .. >> i think it's important for the commander-in-chief to be looking at commitments that we make. >> others? more questions? speeches? opinions about canada? [laughter] >> [inaudible]. >> the former dean wants to make a speech about her youth. [laughter] >> i spent many summers canoeing in canada and singing every morning oh, candidate, which is beautiful. for that reason i made a point in junior high school of studying the history of canada, and why i ha
. neither was infanticide. in fact, the roman law mandated it of especially deformed infants. infants would be left out, taken up into slavery or just die. so you see the moral transformation of the west in accordance with christianity. whether you're christian or not, you can say, yeah, i see this happening. certain things now are held to be bad that before, people that were indifferent about or thought was good. and then beginning -- well, actually, i argue beginning in the early 1500s but certainly by the 1900s and the 20th century, the sort of arc of christianity starts to descend s and as we have increasing secularization of the west, that coip sides with the rise of liberalism because they really are, in many ways if not all ways, the same thing. and you see the same moral issues, you see a clash between the christian moral world view and liberalism. and liberalism generally takes the side of the kind of things that were affirmed in the roman empire. so just as an historian of ethics, i can see that. not even have to take sides, you still see the same ethical transformation historical
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